Pro Contests

The 2005 IFBB Pro Schedule is out.

No Show of Strength. No Night of Champions. No Masters Olympia. No Jan Tana.

For the men, 6 contest in North America, 4 in Europe, one in Australia.

For women’s bodybuilding, only four contests are listed: 3 in North America and one in Europe.

Women’s fitness, 6 contests, all in the US.

Women’s figure, 12 contests, all in the US. The funny thing is that many of these women’s figure pro contests are held in conjunction with NPC amateur shows. I attended the prejudging for a few of these contests this year. It seemed to me that there were two very distinct audiences. The audience for the amateur events took a break while the pros were being judged, and the audience for the pros didn’t arrive until just before the women went on stage, and left immediately afterward.

I wonder how they’re able to combine NPC and IFBB events. Did you know that the NPC is considered a public charity? See http://www.irs.gov/charities/page/0,,id=15053,00.html and enter physique for the name and Pittsburgh, PA for the city and state. None of the other major amateur bodybuilding organizations seem to be listed. (Thanks to NubianMuscle at getbig for this info.)

Clearly the IFBB is a money making business. One would think that cross promotion between the organizations would cause problems. The IFBB can promote the NPC all it wants, but one would think there would be limitations on what the NPC can do for the IFBB. The way the NPC website promotes IFBB events should be enough to put their charity status at risk.

4 Responses to “ Pro Contests ”

  1. ROBERT ANTHONY Says:

    NO NIGHT OF CHAMPIONS? THIS IS THE ONE SHOW I LOOK FOWARD TO ALL YEAR, AND NOW ITS GONE. THINK ABOUT THE FANS FROM NEW YORK. PLEASE RECONSIDER. LETS HAVE A VOTE I FEEL THE BODYBUILDING SUPPORTERS SHOULD HAVE A SAY. WE NEED TO VOICE OUR OPINION.

  2. Don Says:

    HUGE blow here. What’s going on with the IFBB?? Already we lost the Masters Olympia this year. I’m guessing that unless a show shows a huge profit–it’s out. That explains the absence of the Masters Olympia but Night of the Champions??? I thought that was a big show!!

  3. GClifton Says:

    Looks like some major restructuring at work here.

    It would appear “The Night of Champions” is being replaced with the “New York Pro.” No “Masters Olympia” again? What’s going on?
    Is it economics or politics?

  4. Richard Goodman Says:

    The disappearance of the Masters Olympia and The Night of the Champions suggests to me something I have sensed for the last year or two — that the world of professional, IFBB-type bodybuilding is shrinking.

    Look at what’s happening to the bodybuilding media. I had an interesting conversation with Lou Zwick, who used to produce ESPN television shows of bodybuilding competitions, about what caused the end of bodybuilding on television. What it amounts to is drugs and their effects, and the public’s lack of acceptance of this, all of which focused on the death of a pro bodybuilder a week or so after the Arnold a few years back. Since television both forms and reflects the American public’s opinions, so a lack of bodybuilding on televsion is significant.

    Then there is Muscle and Fitness Magazine. It used to be the main bodybuilding magazine in the country. Since Weider sold it to the folks who also put out the National Enquirer, it has veered away from hardcore bodybuilding, and has gone more in the direction of fitness.

    And then there is our present president, who, sensing the public’s dislike of drugs, has actually mentioned steroids and the BALCO. The public doesn’t like drugs, and that’s one of the reasons it doesn’t like professional bodybuilders.

    A while ago when I was talking to a very well-known pro bodybuilder about commercial success, he told me he cannot get even a shred of interest from mainstream companies when it comes to being in their ads.

    Advertisers may shape our perceptions, but they also reflect our values. You talk to marketers and PR people and advertising people and you’ll find they are very concerned and very familiar with what the public thinks and feels. Their job involves being in touch with the reality of the public’s perceptions.

    Unpleasant as the idea may be to many people, I think the world of professional bodybuilding is contracting, and that there will be fewer and fewer opportunities in it as time passes.